Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education

Examining the Use of PhET Simulations on Students’ Attitudes and Learning in General Chemistry II
Issa I Salame 1 * , Jana Makki 1
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1 The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The City College of New York of the City University of New York
* Corresponding Author
Research Article

Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 2021 - Volume 17 Issue 4 - In Progress, Article No: e2247
https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/10966

Published Online: 30 May 2021

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How to cite this article
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Salame & Makki, 2021)
Reference: Salame, I. I., & Makki, J. (2021). Examining the Use of PhET Simulations on Students’ Attitudes and Learning in General Chemistry II. Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 17(4 - In Progress), e2247. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/10966
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Salame II, Makki J. Examining the Use of PhET Simulations on Students’ Attitudes and Learning in General Chemistry II. INTERDISCIPLINARY J ENV SCI ED. 2021;17(4 - In Progress):e2247. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/10966
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Salame II, Makki J. Examining the Use of PhET Simulations on Students’ Attitudes and Learning in General Chemistry II. INTERDISCIPLINARY J ENV SCI ED. 2021;17(4 - In Progress), e2247. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/10966
Chicago
In-text citation: (Salame and Makki, 2021)
Reference: Salame, Issa I, and Jana Makki. "Examining the Use of PhET Simulations on Students’ Attitudes and Learning in General Chemistry II". Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education 2021 17 no. 4 - In Progress (2021): e2247. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/10966
Harvard
In-text citation: (Salame and Makki, 2021)
Reference: Salame, I. I., and Makki, J. (2021). Examining the Use of PhET Simulations on Students’ Attitudes and Learning in General Chemistry II. Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 17(4 - In Progress), e2247. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/10966
MLA
In-text citation: (Salame and Makki, 2021)
Reference: Salame, Issa I et al. "Examining the Use of PhET Simulations on Students’ Attitudes and Learning in General Chemistry II". Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, vol. 17, no. 4 - In Progress, 2021, e2247. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/10966
ABSTRACT
Chemistry is considered difficult to students to learn because many of its concepts are abstract in nature and require visualization at the sub-microscopic level of representation. Physics Education Technology (PhET) offers students the ability to understand and relate both chemical systems and what is happening at the sub-microscopic level through dynamic visualization. Simulations like PhET can be used as a powerful transformative tool for the teaching and learning of science. The research design and paradigm goal is to investigate the students’ perceptions on the impact of PhET simulations on their learning and attitudes and to identify PhET’s most helpful features. The data gathering tool in this research project is a survey that comprised of Likert-type and open-ended questions that was handed out to students who have completed General Chemistry II and were acquainted with PhET simulations as part of their laboratory sessions. The research took place at the City College of New York, an urban, minority serving, and public college. The number of research participants is 158. The implications of the research findings are PhET interactive simulations have an overall positive impact on students’ attitudes and perceptions about learning, PhET simulations promote students’ development of conceptual understanding of chemistry concepts and content, PhET simulations seem to promote and facilitate learning and understanding of abstract concepts, and PhET simulations furnish learning opportunities that otherwise cannot be attained in a traditional laboratory setting.  The data presented in this paper support the notion that there is a need to update and modify general chemistry laboratories to reflect emerging technologies such as PhET interactive simulations.
KEYWORDS
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