Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education

Localizing Discussions of Climate Change Effects May Not Increase Students' Willingness to Engage in Pro-Environmental Behavior
Matthew James Shackley 1 *
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1 University of California, Santa Barbara, UNITED STATES
* Corresponding Author
Research Article

Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 2021 - Volume 17 Issue 4, Article No: e2257
https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11149

Published Online: 17 Aug 2021

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How to cite this article
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Shackley, 2021)
Reference: Shackley, M. J. (2021). Localizing Discussions of Climate Change Effects May Not Increase Students' Willingness to Engage in Pro-Environmental Behavior. Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 17(4), e2257. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11149
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Shackley MJ. Localizing Discussions of Climate Change Effects May Not Increase Students' Willingness to Engage in Pro-Environmental Behavior. INTERDISCIP J ENVIRON SCI EDUC. 2021;17(4):e2257. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11149
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Shackley MJ. Localizing Discussions of Climate Change Effects May Not Increase Students' Willingness to Engage in Pro-Environmental Behavior. INTERDISCIP J ENVIRON SCI EDUC. 2021;17(4), e2257. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11149
Chicago
In-text citation: (Shackley, 2021)
Reference: Shackley, Matthew James. "Localizing Discussions of Climate Change Effects May Not Increase Students' Willingness to Engage in Pro-Environmental Behavior". Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education 2021 17 no. 4 (2021): e2257. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11149
Harvard
In-text citation: (Shackley, 2021)
Reference: Shackley, M. J. (2021). Localizing Discussions of Climate Change Effects May Not Increase Students' Willingness to Engage in Pro-Environmental Behavior. Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 17(4), e2257. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11149
MLA
In-text citation: (Shackley, 2021)
Reference: Shackley, Matthew James "Localizing Discussions of Climate Change Effects May Not Increase Students' Willingness to Engage in Pro-Environmental Behavior". Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, vol. 17, no. 4, 2021, e2257. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11149
ABSTRACT
While acceptance of the reality of climate change is rising among the U.S. population, there still exists an inconsistent willingness of individuals to engage in pro-environmental behaviors (WPEB) to mitigate anthropogenic drivers of warming. Decreasing the temporal and spatial psychological distance between the adverse effects of climate change and students' home communities is one proposed approach that environmental science teachers can take to motivate students to take up attitudes to engage in pro-environmental action. This study used data from a large public survey of Americans' perceptions of climate change to better understand whether existing conceptions of the distance of the effects of climate change affects self-reported WPEB. Two ordinal logistic regression models were constructed to compare temporal distance of effects and spatial distance of effects respectively to the WPEB construct. Both models showed the inverse of the expected relationship, where participants who perceived the effects of climate change as more psychologically distant displayed a greater WPEB. These finding suggest that localizing discussions of climate change alone may not be sufficient to increase students' WPEB.
KEYWORDS
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