INTERDISCIPLINARY JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL AND SCIENCE EDUCATION
Research Article

Parental Instructional Strategies During Family Visit to An Agricultural Exhibition at A Science Museum

Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 2022, 18(2), e2268, https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11663
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ABSTRACT

The aim of this qualitative study was to examine how parents use exhibits’ features during a family visit to a science museum. We observed 44 families during 9 hours and 45 minutes at the “Fields of Tomorrow” exhibition hall. The analysis showed that parents used the physical environment as a resource to engage children with science, taking on the role of “experts” and instructing the novice children. The analysis revealed that parents mainly used four instructional strategies while engaging with the exhibits: 1) connection to everyday life; 2) observation; 3) asking questions; and 4) reading, interpreting, and naming. We also found that parents took advantage of the signs near the exhibits to facilitate their instruction, and their scientific interpretations rarely related to the exhibit’s goals. This study highlights the need for better mediational means at science museums to support visitor engagement.

KEYWORDS

science museum parental instructional strategies interaction analysis

CITATION (APA)

Shaby, N., Ben-Zvi Assaraf, O., & Levy, N. (2022). Parental Instructional Strategies During Family Visit to An Agricultural Exhibition at A Science Museum. Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 18(2), e2268. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11663
Harvard
Shaby, N., Ben-Zvi Assaraf, O., and Levy, N. (2022). Parental Instructional Strategies During Family Visit to An Agricultural Exhibition at A Science Museum. Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 18(2), e2268. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11663
Vancouver
Shaby N, Ben-Zvi Assaraf O, Levy N. Parental Instructional Strategies During Family Visit to An Agricultural Exhibition at A Science Museum. INTERDISCIP J ENV SCI ED. 2022;18(2):e2268. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11663
AMA
Shaby N, Ben-Zvi Assaraf O, Levy N. Parental Instructional Strategies During Family Visit to An Agricultural Exhibition at A Science Museum. INTERDISCIP J ENV SCI ED. 2022;18(2), e2268. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11663
Chicago
Shaby, Neta, Orit Ben-Zvi Assaraf, and Noy Levy. "Parental Instructional Strategies During Family Visit to An Agricultural Exhibition at A Science Museum". Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education 2022 18 no. 2 (2022): e2268. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11663
MLA
Shaby, Neta et al. "Parental Instructional Strategies During Family Visit to An Agricultural Exhibition at A Science Museum". Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, vol. 18, no. 2, 2022, e2268. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11663

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