Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education

Using DPSIR Framework to Determine Secondary School Students’ Conception of Ecological Concepts in the Context of a Wetland Ecosystem
Tsepo Mokuku 1 * , Kabelo Tlhakola 1
More Detail
1 National University of Lesotho, LESOTHO
* Corresponding Author
Research Article

Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 2021 - Volume 17 Issue 4 - In Progress, Article No: e2252
https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11021

Published Online: 25 Jun 2021

Views: 163 | Downloads: 78

How to cite this article
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Mokuku & Tlhakola, 2021)
Reference: Mokuku, T., & Tlhakola, K. (2021). Using DPSIR Framework to Determine Secondary School Students’ Conception of Ecological Concepts in the Context of a Wetland Ecosystem. Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 17(4 - In Progress), e2252. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11021
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Mokuku T, Tlhakola K. Using DPSIR Framework to Determine Secondary School Students’ Conception of Ecological Concepts in the Context of a Wetland Ecosystem. INTERDISCIPLINARY J ENV SCI ED. 2021;17(4 - In Progress):e2252. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11021
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Mokuku T, Tlhakola K. Using DPSIR Framework to Determine Secondary School Students’ Conception of Ecological Concepts in the Context of a Wetland Ecosystem. INTERDISCIPLINARY J ENV SCI ED. 2021;17(4 - In Progress), e2252. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11021
Chicago
In-text citation: (Mokuku and Tlhakola, 2021)
Reference: Mokuku, Tsepo, and Kabelo Tlhakola. "Using DPSIR Framework to Determine Secondary School Students’ Conception of Ecological Concepts in the Context of a Wetland Ecosystem". Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education 2021 17 no. 4 - In Progress (2021): e2252. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11021
Harvard
In-text citation: (Mokuku and Tlhakola, 2021)
Reference: Mokuku, T., and Tlhakola, K. (2021). Using DPSIR Framework to Determine Secondary School Students’ Conception of Ecological Concepts in the Context of a Wetland Ecosystem. Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 17(4 - In Progress), e2252. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11021
MLA
In-text citation: (Mokuku and Tlhakola, 2021)
Reference: Mokuku, Tsepo et al. "Using DPSIR Framework to Determine Secondary School Students’ Conception of Ecological Concepts in the Context of a Wetland Ecosystem". Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, vol. 17, no. 4 - In Progress, 2021, e2252. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11021
ABSTRACT
This study investigated the secondary school students’ conception of ecological concepts, based on wetland ecosystem. The guiding question was ‘What is grade 11 students’ conception of ecological concepts in association with Koro-Koro wetland?’. Thirty-one Grade 11 students were assessed for their understanding, within the Driving-Pressure-State-Impacts-Response (DPSIR) framework. A questionnaire was administered to establish the students’ conceptions. The findings revealed that students’ understanding of their local wetland was relatively better in wetland fauna, and limited in relation to plant diversity, ecosystem energy flow and conceptualization of an ecosystem. Many students could not relate what they learnt in class to their local environment. It is recommended that future studies be directed towards investigating teaching strategies that can effectively enhance students’ scientific understanding of local wetlands.
KEYWORDS
REFERENCES
  • Adekola, O., & Mitchell, G. (2011). The Niger Delta wetlands: Threats to ecosystem services, their importance to dependent communities and possible management measures. International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services & Management, 7(1), 50-68. https://doi.org/10.1080/21513732.2011.603138
  • Ambrose, D. (1998). Birds including annotated species checklist. Institute of Education; National University of Lesotho.
  • Arkwright, A. B. (2014). Fourth and eighth grade student’s conception of energy flow through ecosystem [Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kentucky]. University of Kentucky Institutions Repository. https://uknowledge.uky.edu/edsc_etds/3
  • Barbier, E. B., Acreman, M. C., & Knowler, D. (1997). Economic valuation of wetlands: A guide for policy makers and planners. Ramsar Convention Bureau.
  • Barrow, C. J. (1995). Developing the environment: problems and management. Longman Group Limited.
  • Belle, A. J., & Collins, N., & Jordan, A. (2018). Managing wetlands for disaster risk reduction. A case study of Eastern Free State, South Africa. Jamba Journal of Disaster risk studies, 10(1). https://jamba.org.za/index.php/jamba/article/view/400/829.
  • Bradley, P., & Yee, S. (2015). Using the DPSIR Framework to Develop a Conceptual Model: Technical Support Document. Atlantic Ecology Division, Narragansett, RI. EPA/600/R-15/154. US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development.
  • Cetin, G. (2007). English and Turkish pupils’ understanding of decomposition. Asia Pacific Forum on Science Learning and Teaching, 8(2), Article 5.
  • Cohen, L., Manion, L., & Morrison K. (2007). Research methods in education, Sixth Edition. Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group.
  • Department of Environment (2009). Environmental Education Strategy towards 2014. A strategic plan for Education for Sustainable Development in Lesotho. Ministry of Tourism and Environment.
  • Department of Environment (2009). Lesotho Fourth National Report on Implementation of Convection on Biological Diversity. Ministry of Tourism and Environment.
  • Examination Council of Lesotho [ECOL] (2013). JC Science Examiner’s Report. Ministry of Education and Training.
  • Examination Council of Lesotho [ECOL] (2017). JC Science Examiner’s Report. Ministry of Education and Training.
  • Farquhar, J., & Michels, N. (2016). Triangulation without tears. In M. Groza & C. Ragland (Eds.), Marketing challenges in a turbulent business environment. Developments in marketing science: Proceedings of the academy of marketing science. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-19428-8_86
  • Fortuin, K. P. J., Van Koppen C. S. A., & Leemans, R. (2011). The value of conceptual models in coping with complexity and interdisciplinary in environmental sciences. Bioscience, 60(10), 802-814. https://doi.org/10.1525/bio.2011.61.10.10
  • Helldén, G., & Helldén, S. (2008). Students’ early experiences of biodiversity and education for a sustainable future. Nordina, 4(2), 123-131.
  • Honorene, J. (2017). Understanding the role of triangulation in research. Scholarly Research Journal for Interdisciplinary Studies, 4(31), 91-95.
  • Jordan, R., Gray, S. & Demeter, M. (2009). An assessment of students’ understanding of ecosystem concepts: Conflating Ecological systems and cycles. Applied Environmental Education and Communication, 8, 40-48.
  • Kristensen, P. (2004). The DPSIR Framework. National Environmental Research Institute, Denmark
  • Levin, P. S., Breslow, S. J., Harvey, C. J., Norman, K. C, Poe, M. R., Williams, G. D., & Plummer, M. L. (2016). Conceptualization of social ecological systems of the California current: An examination of interdisciplinary science supporting ecosystem-based management. Coastal Management, 44(5), 397-408. https://doi.org/10.1080/08920753.2016.1208036
  • Lotz-Sisitka, H. (2005). Situated culture and new learning theory: Emerging perspectives in environmental education research. Southern African Journal of Environmental Education, 22, 5-10.
  • Matthews, G. V. T. (2013). The Ramsar convection on wetlands: Its history and development. Ramsar.
  • Merriam, S. B. (1998). Qualitative research and case study applications in education. Jossey-Bass Publishers
  • Menzel, S., & Bӧgeholz, S. (2009). The loss of biodiversity as a challenge for sustainable development: How do pupils in Chile and Germany perceive resource dilemmas? Research in Science Education, 39, 429-447.
  • Mills, J., Harrison, H., Franklin, R., & Birks, M. (2017). Case study research: Foundations and methodological orientations. Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 18(1), 1-17. https:// doi.org/10.17169/fqs-18.1.2655
  • Ministry of Forestry, Range and Soil Conservation (2015). National Action Programme. Report to the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification. Government of Lesotho. Government of Lesotho Printers.
  • Ministry of Natural Resources. (2004, February). Report on the Commemoration of the World Wetlands Day in Lesotho. Government of Lesotho.
  • Minshew, L. M., Barber-Lester, K. J., Derry, S. J., & Anderson, J. L. (2017). Leveraging students’ knowledge to adapt science curricula to local context. Educational Technology and Society, 20(4), 205-218.
  • Mitchell, D. B. (2009). A philosophical analysis of David Orr’s theory of ecological literacy: Biophillia, ecojustice and moral education in middle school learning communities [Doctoral Thesis, University of Georgia]. The University of Georgia Press. https://getd.libs.uga.edu/pdfs/mitchell_debra_b_200905_ma.pdf.
  • Mokuku, T., & Taylor, J. (2015). Tlokoeng Valley community’s conceptions of wetlands: Prospects for more sustainable water resources management. Journal of Education for Sustainable Development, 9(2), 196-212. https://doi.org/10.1177/0973408215588254
  • Molapo, L., Stears, M., & Dempster, E. (2014). Does environment knowledge inform the everyday practices of senior secondary biology learners in Lesotho. Southern African Journal of Environmental Education, 30, 118-129.
  • National Curriculum Development Corporation (2008). JC Science Syllabus. Government of Lesotho Printers.
  • National Environment Secretariat, (2000). Biological Diversity in Lesotho. Morija Printing Works.
  • Olsen, W. (2004). Triangulation in social research: Qualitative and quantitative methods can really be mixed. Auseway Press.
  • Rabiatul, A., & Norizan, E. (2013). Ecological literacy among secondary school students. CoSMED 2013 5th Conference on Science and Mathematics Education 11-14 November 2013. FS8 RAMJ, Penang, Malaysia.
  • Russi, D., ten Brink, P., Farmer, A., Badura, T., Coates, D., Förster, J., Kumar, R., & Davidson, N. (2013). The economics of ecosystems and biodiversity for water and wetlands. Institute for European Environmental Policy & Ramsar Secretariat.
  • Schizas, D., Katrana, E., & Stamou, G. (2013). Introducing network analysis into science Education: Methodological research examining secondary school students’ understanding of decomposition. International Journal of Environmental & Science Education, 8(1), 175-198.
  • Shepardson, D. P., Wee, B., Priddy, M., & Schelleenberger, L. (2007). What is a watershed? Implications of student conceptions for environmental science education and the National Science Education Standards. Science Education, 91, 554-578. https://doi.org/10.1002/sce.20206
  • TEEB (2010). The economics of ecosystems and biodiversity ecological and economic foundations. Earthscan, London.
  • Tlhakola, K. D. (2017). Investigating useful local knowledge on loss of biodiversity at Ha Mokuoane and its implications for school curriculum. Research Report. National University of Lesotho.
  • Toman, U. (2018). An Investigation into the learning of ecological concepts. European Journal of Educational Research, 7(3), 631-638.
  • UNESCO & UNFCCC (2016). Action for climate empowerment. Guidelines for accelerating solutions through education, training and public awareness. https://unfccc.int/files/cooperation_and_support/education_and_outreach/application/pdf/action_for_climate_empowerment_guidelines.pdf.
  • Wandersee, J. H., & Schussler, E. E. (1999). Preventing plant blindness. The American Biology Teacher, 61(2). 82-86.
  • Weston, M. A., Tzaros, C. L. & Antos, M. J. (2006). Awareness of wetlands and their conservation values among students at a primary school in Victoria, Australia. Ecological Management and Restoration, 7(3), 223-226.
  • Yamaguchi, K., & Okada, K. (2018). Comparison among cognitive diagnostic models for the TIMSS2007 fourth grade mathematics assessment. PLoS ONE 13(2). e0188691. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0188691
  • Yardimci, E., & Kilic, G. (2010). Children’s views of environment and environmental problems. Elementary Education Online, 9(3), 1122-1136.
  • Yorek, N., Aydin, H., Ugulu, I., & Dogan, Y. (2008). Investigation on students’ perceptions of biodiversity. Natura Montenegrina, Podgorica, 7(3), 175-184.
  • Yorek, N., Sahin, M., Ugulu, I., & Dogan, Y. (2010). A Qualitative investigation of students' understanding about ecosystem and its components. Natural Montenegrina, 9(3), 973-981.
LICENSE
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.