INTERDISCIPLINARY JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL AND SCIENCE EDUCATION

Keyword: Student learning

2 results found.

Research Article
Facilitating Problem Solving in a University Undergraduate Physics Classroom: The Case of Students’ Self-Efficacy
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 2022, 18(2), e2270, https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11802
ABSTRACT: Real-life and work-related situations of the 21st century present complex problems that require graduates to possess the skills to solve problems in challenging and unfamiliar arenas. Students must therefore have the skills to deal with a wide range of problems. Unfortunately, most students struggle to apply their learning to novel problem-solving situations regardless of their self-efficacy beliefs. It appears particularly significant to investigate this phenomenon in the context of physics education. Using a mixed-methods design within a collaborative learning environment (CLE), this study investigated the factors that influence students’ self-efficacy in solving conceptual mathematical problems in physics. The primary data sources were the science problem solving questionnaire (SPSQ), the self-efficacy rating scale (SERS), and two semi-structured interview items. The results of multi-level regression and descriptive data analysis revealed students’ self-efficacy in solving conceptual mathematical problems in physics (β=.16, p<.01, SE=.065). Among all the self-efficacy variables (e.g., mastery experience, vicarious experience, physical arousal, anxiety, and gender), mastery experiences composed the largest amount of unique variance between male and female students (36% and 21%). The regression coefficient showed a significant difference between male (β=.13, p<.01, SE=.02) and female (β=.34, p<.01, SE=.07). Female students reported slightly higher levels of anxiety (3%) than male students (2%) when completing the SPSQ. In terms of physiological states, females reported 7% and males 1%. The results also showed a strong positive relationship between the instructional approach and student performance (r=.86, p<.001). One major implication of this study is that science educators could include appropriate instruction in delivering content courses to potentially support student teachers at the beginning of their science education studies.
Research Article
The Use of The Lesser Kestrel’s Life Cycle to Enhance Elementary School Children’s Understanding of Complex Systems
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 2021, 17(1), e2226, https://doi.org/10.29333/ijese/9152
ABSTRACT: Understanding the complexity of ecological system is crucial if one is to achieve a proper understanding of what they are and how they function. This study followed an environmental education program designed to introduce fifth grade students from a highly rural community to the world of ornithology and to the importance of maintaining the biodiversity of birds in nature. Its goal was to explore the program’s influence on the development of these students’ system thinking skills in the context of the life-cycle of the Lesser Kestrel (LK). Students’ perceptions of system complexity were tracked using the repertory grid technique, which takes the form of a highly structured interview in which constructs represent participants’ interpretations of various elements and the relationships between them. The results indicate that these fifth graders developed a significantly complex view of the LK’s ecosystem. Participation in the program developed the ability of some of the students to generalize and to identify changes that occurred in the birds’ ecosystem over time. Design elements such as longitudinal real-time observations and learning about the kestrel’s life-cycle while examining its interaction with its environment were found to be important for system thinking development. These cognitive tools may enable students to better cope with complex, biodiversity-related environmental issues in the future.