INTERDISCIPLINARY JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL AND SCIENCE EDUCATION

Keyword: collaborative learning

2 results found.

Research Article
Facilitating Problem Solving in a University Undergraduate Physics Classroom: The Case of Students’ Self-Efficacy
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 2022, 18(2), e2270, https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/11802
ABSTRACT: Real-life and work-related situations of the 21st century present complex problems that require graduates to possess the skills to solve problems in challenging and unfamiliar arenas. Students must therefore have the skills to deal with a wide range of problems. Unfortunately, most students struggle to apply their learning to novel problem-solving situations regardless of their self-efficacy beliefs. It appears particularly significant to investigate this phenomenon in the context of physics education. Using a mixed-methods design within a collaborative learning environment (CLE), this study investigated the factors that influence students’ self-efficacy in solving conceptual mathematical problems in physics. The primary data sources were the science problem solving questionnaire (SPSQ), the self-efficacy rating scale (SERS), and two semi-structured interview items. The results of multi-level regression and descriptive data analysis revealed students’ self-efficacy in solving conceptual mathematical problems in physics (β=.16, p<.01, SE=.065). Among all the self-efficacy variables (e.g., mastery experience, vicarious experience, physical arousal, anxiety, and gender), mastery experiences composed the largest amount of unique variance between male and female students (36% and 21%). The regression coefficient showed a significant difference between male (β=.13, p<.01, SE=.02) and female (β=.34, p<.01, SE=.07). Female students reported slightly higher levels of anxiety (3%) than male students (2%) when completing the SPSQ. In terms of physiological states, females reported 7% and males 1%. The results also showed a strong positive relationship between the instructional approach and student performance (r=.86, p<.001). One major implication of this study is that science educators could include appropriate instruction in delivering content courses to potentially support student teachers at the beginning of their science education studies.
Research Article
The Impact of Supplemental Instruction on the Learning Achievements and Attitudes of Organic Chemistry Students
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 2021, 17(2), e2232, https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/9330
ABSTRACT: Supplemental Instruction (SI) has been a successful implementation into Colleges and Universities across the globe. SI has been found to reduce attrition and improve learning and success rate among participating students. At the City College of New York, we recently implemented SI into Organic Chemistry I courses to further support struggling students with the content and concept learning of Organic Chemistry, which is considered a difficult course with a high attrition rate. Our motivation for this research was to examine the impact of SI integration in a large lecture format Organic Chemistry course while assisting students learn and succeed in this challenging course. The objective of this research is to examine whether supplemental instruction (SI) impacts participants’ learning achievement, attitudes, and learning competencies. The experimental design was based on a quasi-experimental approach which included a questionnaire of open-ended and Likert-scaled questions that was distributed to SI participants, and SI participants’ grades were compared to the grades of non-SI participants. Data suggest that integrating Supplemental Instruction (SI) into Organic Chemistry courses positively impacts students’ attitudes towards the content and experience in the course, helps them better understand concepts and materials, improves students’ problem-solving skills, and is effective in improving students’ achievement, success, and the learning. SI participants had an overall passing average of 81%, compared to about 50% for non-SI participants. SI participation provided the participants with a unique and individualized learning experience that resulted in an enhanced conceptual understanding.