Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education

A Study of Argumentation-Based Science Concept Mapping Teaching Approach in Identifying Students’ Learning Performances towards Scientific Process Skills
King-Dow Su 1 *
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1 Hungkuo Delin University of Technology
* Corresponding Author
Research Article

Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 2020 - Volume 16 Issue 4, Article No: e2222
https://doi.org/10.29333/ijese/8544

Published Online: 18 Sep 2020

Views: 183 | Downloads: 132

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APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Su, 2020)
Reference: Su, K. (2020). A Study of Argumentation-Based Science Concept Mapping Teaching Approach in Identifying Students’ Learning Performances towards Scientific Process Skills. Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 16(4), e2222. https://doi.org/10.29333/ijese/8544
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Su K. A Study of Argumentation-Based Science Concept Mapping Teaching Approach in Identifying Students’ Learning Performances towards Scientific Process Skills. Int J Env Sci Ed. 2020;16(4):e2222. https://doi.org/10.29333/ijese/8544
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Su K. A Study of Argumentation-Based Science Concept Mapping Teaching Approach in Identifying Students’ Learning Performances towards Scientific Process Skills. Int J Env Sci Ed. 2020;16(4), e2222. https://doi.org/10.29333/ijese/8544
Chicago
In-text citation: (Su, 2020)
Reference: Su, King-Dow. "A Study of Argumentation-Based Science Concept Mapping Teaching Approach in Identifying Students’ Learning Performances towards Scientific Process Skills". Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education 2020 16 no. 4 (2020): e2222. https://doi.org/10.29333/ijese/8544
Harvard
In-text citation: (Su, 2020)
Reference: Su, K. (2020). A Study of Argumentation-Based Science Concept Mapping Teaching Approach in Identifying Students’ Learning Performances towards Scientific Process Skills. Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 16(4), e2222. https://doi.org/10.29333/ijese/8544
MLA
In-text citation: (Su, 2020)
Reference: Su, King-Dow "A Study of Argumentation-Based Science Concept Mapping Teaching Approach in Identifying Students’ Learning Performances towards Scientific Process Skills". Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, vol. 16, no. 4, 2020, e2222. https://doi.org/10.29333/ijese/8544
ABSTRACT
The application for burning incenses case study both indoors and outdoors is a controversial issues of value-laden and moral dilemma in Taiwan. This research aimed at using the argumentation-based case study as burning incenses with concept mapping approach in identifying students’ learning performances towards scientific process skills. It was followed by an argumentation-based approach of pre-tests, post-tests and interviews designed for 139 qualified participants. All data collected from two experimental group students’ argumentation-based learning performances and feedback was further analyzed by means of open-ended achievement tests, descriptive statistical analysis of learning attitude and the narration of students’ interviews. Analytical results indicated that the argumentation-based texts were successfully designed for students’ learning guidance by instructor. An evaluation tools with content validity and good reliability (Cronbach’s α > .9) were developed to assess students’ argumentation-based learning performances. The achievement posttest finding revealed that two experimental group students enhanced their science argumentation skills of higher level than pretests. The further t-test of achievement posttest didn’t indicate any significant differences (p> .05) for two experimental group students. Students’ positive learning feedbacks also provided the predominant advantage for activating responsive reasons, promoting their critical thinking, enhancing self-confidence of science process skills and supporting teachers in argumentation teaching.
KEYWORDS
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