INTERDISCIPLINARY JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL AND SCIENCE EDUCATION
Research Article

Adding Relevancy to STEM Interest Through Adventure Education: A Mixed Methods Study

Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 2022, 18(4), e2294, https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/12214
Full Text (PDF)

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this mixed methods concurrent triangulation study was to assess the vocational relevancy of adventure STEM for sixth grade students attending the Science Adventure School (SAS), a residential, informal education program focused on delivering adventure STEM education to low-income, rural students. Specifically, this study sought to research any changes in STEM attitudes, including science interest (Eccles, 2007; Gilmartin et al., 2007) and science career interest (Sadler et al., 2011) as a result of participating in SAS. In the quantitative phase of the study, curriculum relevancy and STEM attitudes were assessed with a pre- and post- adventure STEM experience survey. The qualitative portion of the study consisted of semi-structured in-person interviews with 14 students and eight teachers shortly after their SAS experience to gain additional insights into the results of the statistical analysis and identify how students and teachers see the relevancy of adventure STEM curriculum. This study’s findings add to the body of adventure STEM literature and lends support to the positive benefits of engaging youth in adventure STEM programming.

KEYWORDS

STEM education adventure education informal education outdoor learning

CITATION (APA)

Morgan, A., Smaldone, D., Selin, S., Deng, J., & Holmes, M. (2022). Adding Relevancy to STEM Interest Through Adventure Education: A Mixed Methods Study. Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 18(4), e2294. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/12214
Harvard
Morgan, A., Smaldone, D., Selin, S., Deng, J., and Holmes, M. (2022). Adding Relevancy to STEM Interest Through Adventure Education: A Mixed Methods Study. Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 18(4), e2294. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/12214
Vancouver
Morgan A, Smaldone D, Selin S, Deng J, Holmes M. Adding Relevancy to STEM Interest Through Adventure Education: A Mixed Methods Study. INTERDISCIP J ENV SCI ED. 2022;18(4):e2294. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/12214
AMA
Morgan A, Smaldone D, Selin S, Deng J, Holmes M. Adding Relevancy to STEM Interest Through Adventure Education: A Mixed Methods Study. INTERDISCIP J ENV SCI ED. 2022;18(4), e2294. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/12214
Chicago
Morgan, Alice, Dave Smaldone, Steven Selin, Jinyang Deng, and Marion Holmes. "Adding Relevancy to STEM Interest Through Adventure Education: A Mixed Methods Study". Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education 2022 18 no. 4 (2022): e2294. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/12214
MLA
Morgan, Alice et al. "Adding Relevancy to STEM Interest Through Adventure Education: A Mixed Methods Study". Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, vol. 18, no. 4, 2022, e2294. https://doi.org/10.21601/ijese/12214

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