Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education

Allying With The Plants: A Pedagogical Path Towards The Planthroposcene
Irida Tsevreni 1 *
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1 Department of Early Childhood Education, University of Thessaly, GREECE
* Corresponding Author
Research Article

Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 2021 - Volume 17 Issue 4 - In Progress, Article No: e2249

Published Online: 17 Jun 2021

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APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Tsevreni, 2021)
Reference: Tsevreni, I. (2021). Allying With The Plants: A Pedagogical Path Towards The Planthroposcene. Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 17(4 - In Progress), e2249.
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Tsevreni I. Allying With The Plants: A Pedagogical Path Towards The Planthroposcene. INTERDISCIPLINARY J ENV SCI ED. 2021;17(4 - In Progress):e2249.
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Tsevreni I. Allying With The Plants: A Pedagogical Path Towards The Planthroposcene. INTERDISCIPLINARY J ENV SCI ED. 2021;17(4 - In Progress), e2249.
Chicago
In-text citation: (Tsevreni, 2021)
Reference: Tsevreni, Irida. "Allying With The Plants: A Pedagogical Path Towards The Planthroposcene". Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education 2021 17 no. 4 - In Progress (2021): e2249.
Harvard
In-text citation: (Tsevreni, 2021)
Reference: Tsevreni, I. (2021). Allying With The Plants: A Pedagogical Path Towards The Planthroposcene. Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 17(4 - In Progress), e2249.
MLA
In-text citation: (Tsevreni, 2021)
Reference: Tsevreni, Irida "Allying With The Plants: A Pedagogical Path Towards The Planthroposcene". Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, vol. 17, no. 4 - In Progress, 2021, e2249.
ABSTRACT
The notion of the Planthroposcene is based on an attempt to disconnect from the sustainability rhetoric of the Anthropocene and to choose to overcome the ecological crisis through an ecocentric path. In the current research, students of a Pedagogical Department at a University in Greece were encouraged to investigate their relationship with plants, to ally with them and to reflect on their experience, experimenting in an alternative way of empowering their ecological consciousness, away from the traditional environmental education practice based on sustainability. They designed and proposed activities, exploring and strengthening their connection to plants. Their activities were implemented through mindfulness techniques (meditation, yoga), art-based practices (drawing, dramatization, poem writing, dance) and taking action. The data analysis revealed that the students through their activities practiced participatory observation, communication, sensorial and embodied experience with plants. The manifestation of empathy for the otherness of plant-being also took place.
KEYWORDS
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