Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education

Environmental Immersion and Mobile Filmmaking for Science Education: a New Zealand Pilot Study
Wiebke Finkler 1, Fabien Medvecky 2, Lloyd Spencer Davis 2 *
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1 Department of Marketing, University of Otago, New Zealand
2 Centre for Science Communication, University of Otago, New Zealand
* Corresponding Author
Research Article

Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 2021 - Volume 17 Issue 1, Article No: e2228
https://doi.org/10.29333/ijese/9155

Published Online: 11 Nov 2020

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How to cite this article
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Finkler et al., 2021)
Reference: Finkler, W., Medvecky, F., & Davis, L. S. (2021). Environmental Immersion and Mobile Filmmaking for Science Education: a New Zealand Pilot Study. Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 17(1), e2228. https://doi.org/10.29333/ijese/9155
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Finkler W, Medvecky F, Davis LS. Environmental Immersion and Mobile Filmmaking for Science Education: a New Zealand Pilot Study. Int J Env Sci Ed. 2021;17(1):e2228. https://doi.org/10.29333/ijese/9155
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Finkler W, Medvecky F, Davis LS. Environmental Immersion and Mobile Filmmaking for Science Education: a New Zealand Pilot Study. Int J Env Sci Ed. 2021;17(1), e2228. https://doi.org/10.29333/ijese/9155
Chicago
In-text citation: (Finkler et al., 2021)
Reference: Finkler, Wiebke, Fabien Medvecky, and Lloyd Spencer Davis. "Environmental Immersion and Mobile Filmmaking for Science Education: a New Zealand Pilot Study". Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education 2021 17 no. 1 (2021): e2228. https://doi.org/10.29333/ijese/9155
Harvard
In-text citation: (Finkler et al., 2021)
Reference: Finkler, W., Medvecky, F., and Davis, L. S. (2021). Environmental Immersion and Mobile Filmmaking for Science Education: a New Zealand Pilot Study. Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 17(1), e2228. https://doi.org/10.29333/ijese/9155
MLA
In-text citation: (Finkler et al., 2021)
Reference: Finkler, Wiebke et al. "Environmental Immersion and Mobile Filmmaking for Science Education: a New Zealand Pilot Study". Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, vol. 17, no. 1, 2021, e2228. https://doi.org/10.29333/ijese/9155
ABSTRACT
To test whether environmental immersion and mobile filmmaking (using smartphones or tablets) can engender positive attitudes to science, seventeen Year 10 (14-15 years old) drama students from Queen’s High School, New Zealand, were taken to Westland National Park to make videos about climate change using iPads (Immersion Group). Another fourteen students (Control Group) remained in Dunedin and also produced videos about climate change. Both groups had equal access to equipment, tutoring, incentives and footage. Yet, students in the Immersion Group were more likely to complete videos and produced videos of a higher quality. While there were no differences between the two groups in their attitudes to science before the experiment, afterwards the Immersion Group students had significantly more positive attitudes to doing science at school and beyond. The combination of environmental immersion and mobile filmmaking substantially increased interest in the environment and climate change, suggesting that it offers a promising tool for science education.
KEYWORDS
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